Self help and peer support

Casstevens, J.W., Cohen D., Newman F.L., & Dumaine, M.. (2006) Evaluation of a Mentored Self-Help Intervention for the Management of Psychotic Symptoms. International Journal of Psychosocial Rehabilitation. 11 (1), 37-49

Abstract
This pilot study employs a quasi-experimental pre-post design (n = 27) to evaluate the impact of a mentored self-help workbook (Coleman & Smith, 1997) intervention. Participants are diagnosed with severe and persistent mental disorders and experience medication-resistant psychotic symptoms. The cognitive-behaviorally based workbook is used to target improved self-management of affective and psychotic symptoms. The intervention can be implemented in community mental health settings by staff with less training than specialized or licensed clinicians. Results show statistically significant improvement on the Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale factor for Anxious Depression.

Julie Downs, (Ed), (2001) Starting and Supporting Voices Groups: A Guide to setting up and running support groups for people who hear voices, see visions or experience tactile or other sensations. Hearing Voices Network, Manchester, England

S. Escher, (October, 1993); Talking about voices, Open Mind Magazine

A. Escher, M. Romme, (no date); Effects of Mutual Contacts from People with Auditory Hallucinations, Lecture at Manchester, Sheffield and Liverpool Universities

S. Escher, (October, 1993); Talking about voices, Open Mind Magazine

I Leudar, P Thomas and M. Johnston: Self Repair for in dialogues of schizophrenics: effects of hallucinations and negative symptoms, (1992) Brain and Language 43: 487 – 511

Terry McLeod, Mervyn Morris, Max Birchwood, Alan Dovey (2007): Work with voice hearers: evaluation of effectiveness of hearing voices groups (parts one and two) , British Journal of Nursing, 2007, Vol 16, No 4
More information including abstract and link to full papers

Sara Meddings, Linda Walley, Tracy Collins, Fay Tullett, Bruce McEwan and Kate Owen, The voices don’t like it…, Mental health Today (September 2006),

Abstract
Hearing voices groups have been shown to benefit members by reducing the power and influence of the voices and providing an important source of peer and social support. Sara Meddings and colleagues report the findings of the first ever study to use standardised measures to gauge the impact of attendance at a hearing voices group. Their study quantified statistically significant improvements in participants’ ability to live with and even control their voices, as well as collecting evidence of the qualitative benefits of knowing that others are also struggling with what can be a very isolating and alienating phenomenon.

Link to full paper

One response to “Self help and peer support”

  1. lia xerogiannaki

    Terry McLeod, Mervyn Morris, Max Birchwood, Alan Dovey (2007): Work with voice hearers: evaluation of effectiveness of hearing voices groups (parts one and two) , British Journal of Nursing, 2007, Vol 16, No

    i would like to send me this article because i can’t find it.

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